Teacher’s guide to using SAMSON as a learning tool in high school

SAMSON is a desktop application for molecular modeling that is available for Windows, Linux and Mac at SAMSON Connect. In this guide, you will find activities that can be performed with high school students in physics, chemistry and biology classes using SAMSON. This guide starts with a couple of tutorials about SAMSON to feel at ease with the software, followed by two tutorials on elementary chemistry. After becoming sufficiently autonomous in SAMSON, there are two possible paths to choose from.…

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First steps on SAMSON

In this tutorial you will learn how to use SAMSON, or at least, after reading this, you should be able to know some of the basics of the software (like creating molecules, running simulations, etc..). If you want more (maybe deeper) information regarding SAMSON, especially on its interface,  you can check out this link. That is your survival guide on SAMSON if you encounter any troubles with the interface or a particular icon. Opening up SAMSON When you open SAMSON…

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Nanocarbons : Graphene, nanotube and fullerene

For some years now, we have heard a lot more about nanostructures and especially about nanocarbons. You will see here the most famous nanostructures which are the graphene and the carbon nanotube… What’s graphene? You probably already know it, but for the two of you in the back who didn’t pay attention, we will remind you that it’s a plane of multiple six carbon cycles. You might as well know of graphite. So what’s the difference between those two carbon…

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Chair, Boat and Twist-Boat Conformation of Cyclohexanes and Glucose

This tutorial is going to teach you about the different conformations (shapes) of the cyclohexane (C6H12) and the glucose (C6H12O6).   Cyclohexane: So, a cyclohexane is usually represented like this: Its bond angles between the carbon atoms measure 120°, but is this really accurate? And is there more than one way to represent these tricky molecules? To start of, what is a cyclohexane? Well, it is a cyclic hydrocarbon, formed by 6 carbon atoms in a hexagon, with each one…

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Open and manipulate bigger molecules

Now that you know how to create your own molecules, you have to know how to save them and reopen them. Open a “.pdb” file Click on “File” then “Open…” or just press “Ctrl+O”, then select “chassis.pdb”. After you have clicked, a window should appear. Tick the boxes as done in this image: Now open the file  “roue.pdb” four times. Moving bigger molecules On the display window you only see one molecule… But still, you opened it four times? Well, as…

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